Get more out of food rewards.



  • Does this sound familiar to you? Your dog is locked onto a prey animal and nothing you can do can break their focus.


  • In those moments you know you could dress in a suit made from sirloin steak and wear a roast lamb hat - and your dog would still ignore you.


  • Have you wasted more time and money than you like to think about trying to find that perfect food that will get your dog's attention in those moments?


  • What if I could show you how to make food more interesting to your dog so that you have less of these problems?




Did you know that eating can provide the following benefits.


  • Sniffing out food is enriching for dogs, improving their lives - and if you are giving them the food to find STRENGTHENING your relationship into the bargain.


  • Eating is calming and soothing for dogs so it is GREAT for helping them to settle if things have gotten too exciting.


  • Having a dog who eats reliably means you will make progress in your training more easily.


  • Food is one of the easiest ways to reward your dog and is a great tool to have in your toolbox.




woman with dog on green background





image of a Facebook post



How amazing would you feel if your dog could





If any of that sounded good to you, I have brilliant news for you. I have a class just for you - it's called Focus on Food.


In it I'll show you how to use food to make it more interesting and relevant to your dog. Don't worry - I'm not going to tell you to starve your dog or only feed them when you're training them or anything like that. Those measures are not necessary.









image of a Trustpilot review



What you get

With this one you'll get.







Woman with a dog.









My journey into dog training started with my first dog who was a male bullmastiff named Calgacus. When he was a young dog, we found a lovely training class, and Calgacus and I learned all about clicker training. Things were pretty good until Calgacus reached adolescence.


Our dog trainer, keen to help us with some of the normal challenges with adolescent dogs, offered me some advice, which I followed with disastrous consequences. Calgacus became aggressive toward other dogs.


He attacked and severely injured one dog and responded with aggression toward any dog he could see when we were out - no matter how far away they were.


That was where I really started learning about dog behaviour and training.


In the years that followed, I trained to be a Tellington TTouch Practitioner. During those years, Calgacus got over his issues with other dogs.


He would make himself smaller and would move slowly to reassure nervous dogs. He would play with bouncy, playful dogs.


He was so good that I spent five years as a student at Bishop Burton College getting a BSc (hons) degree in Canine Behaviour and Training. Calgacus was my training partner for the practical tests. He learned to be a gundog in first year, and in second year, he and I were tested by doing a four-minute heelwork to music routine.


More recently, my friend and mentor Sarah Fisher invited me to be one of her ACE Advanced Tutors, which is something I feel a great deal of pride about.


In among all of that, I wrote a book about the experiences that Calgacus and I had together Canine aggression: Rehabilitating an aggressive dog with kindness and compassion.


Over the years, I have trained my own dogs for a variety of dog sports to varying levels. These include Heelwork to Music, Gundog Training, Working Trials, Kennel Club Good Citizen tests, Agility, and, most recently, Scentwork UK.


I have a passion for problem-solving and have been lucky enough to share my life with dogs who prove to have challenges in one way or another.


I have worked to help my dogs through issues such as dog to dog aggression, resource guarding between dogs and issues caused by one of my dogs having an extremely high prey drive.


Alongside running Best Dog Learning and Stuff and supporting people with their dogs, I'm currently a student again and am studying for an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Training.









image of a Trustpilot review



The price for this class is a BRILLIANT £30.


If you aren't logged in, you will be prompted to log in before you can buy the course. You can create an account using the login form if you don't already have one.






Maybe you still have some questions.


What exactly do I get for my money?


How do I access the class?

It'll be available on my website. Make sure that when you sign up on my website that you enter your email address correctly as I'll use that email address to send out all the information.


How long do I have access?

For life. Well, possibly not for your life. For the lifetime of the website – which I hope will be a very long time.


What if I don't like it?

I don't have a refund policy on this workshop. I hope I've given enough information to let you decide. But – if you really hate it, email me on admin@bestdoglearningandstuff.co.uk, and we can discuss.


What if I don't get your emails?

Email me on admin@bestdoglearningandstuff.co.uk, and I'll help you.


Will I have to correct my dog?

No. All my training is done with treats, Animal Centred Education (ACE) and Tellington TTouch. No corrections needed.


Tracey, what are your qualifications?

I have a BSc(Hons) degree in Canine behaviour and training. I'm a Tellington TTouch practitioner and an ACE Advanced Tutor. I'm currently studying for an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Training as well.









“It is fabulous to have support from Tracey who really understands our problems. Having read her excellent book has also been an inspiration to us."

Jennifer Frances Jones





The price for this class is a BRILLIANT £30.


If you aren't logged in, you will be prompted to log in before you can buy the course. You can create an account using the login form if you don't already have one.








Legal Disclaimer: I would love to promise you the same results as I got from this training. I would also love to promise you how long it will take. I simply can't give any guarantees. Success in dog training depends on a range of factors including but not limited to: your own efforts, your skill at implementing the training suggested, the time you spend on training, as well as your dog's prior experiences, health, and temperament. You remain responsible for your dog's behaviour.